Creating an Age Friendly Darebin

A range of Commonwealth Home Support services for approximately 2,500 older residents are currently provided by Darebin Council each month. The services include basic personal care and home support.

The changes introduced by the federal government have altered the way older people in Australia can access aged care services. The federal government continues to fund aged care services and is making further changes to how the funding and services work.


Mayor Cr Kim Le Cerf says


“Darebin Council is absolutely committed to creating an age-friendly city where older people are valued, supported and empowered to live well in our community.”


“We need to look at how we should be addressing issues of social inclusion, transport and facilities, as well as vital health and support services. We know that the people using Darebin Council’s existing services for older people strongly value those services, and are concerned about the federal government’s changes. That’s why we need a broad-ranging review and consultation process. We also need to look at potential new services, programs and facilities which may help create an Age Friendly Darebin.”

Darebin Council currently contributes about $6 million per year to services for older people, providing services to about 3,300 clients in 2016/17. Council is looking to maintain this investment in the health and well-being of older people, while also ensuring resources are used in the best way possible.

A panel of independent experts has been appointed to gather evidence and advise Council. The panel will issue a public discussion paper in July and invite submissions.

Everyone can have a say and contribute to the decision making process. Every submission will be assessed by the expert panel and a (public) hearing will be held once the submissions have closed in September. After that, a preliminary report will be released in November for further public comment. The final report and recommendations will be submitted to the council in February 2019. Council will consider the report and recommendations at a meeting in March 2019 to decide how to create an Age Friendly Darebin, and how the City of Darebin should provide services to older people in the longer term future.

What can you do?

Council will keep you informed throughout the decision making process. You will hear from us once the panel of experts has started and how you can have your say. Read the related reports and find answers to Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) on this page. Stay in touch and leave your comments and suggestions in the section below.



A range of Commonwealth Home Support services for approximately 2,500 older residents are currently provided by Darebin Council each month. The services include basic personal care and home support.

The changes introduced by the federal government have altered the way older people in Australia can access aged care services. The federal government continues to fund aged care services and is making further changes to how the funding and services work.


Mayor Cr Kim Le Cerf says


“Darebin Council is absolutely committed to creating an age-friendly city where older people are valued, supported and empowered to live well in our community.”


“We need to look at how we should be addressing issues of social inclusion, transport and facilities, as well as vital health and support services. We know that the people using Darebin Council’s existing services for older people strongly value those services, and are concerned about the federal government’s changes. That’s why we need a broad-ranging review and consultation process. We also need to look at potential new services, programs and facilities which may help create an Age Friendly Darebin.”

Darebin Council currently contributes about $6 million per year to services for older people, providing services to about 3,300 clients in 2016/17. Council is looking to maintain this investment in the health and well-being of older people, while also ensuring resources are used in the best way possible.

A panel of independent experts has been appointed to gather evidence and advise Council. The panel will issue a public discussion paper in July and invite submissions.

Everyone can have a say and contribute to the decision making process. Every submission will be assessed by the expert panel and a (public) hearing will be held once the submissions have closed in September. After that, a preliminary report will be released in November for further public comment. The final report and recommendations will be submitted to the council in February 2019. Council will consider the report and recommendations at a meeting in March 2019 to decide how to create an Age Friendly Darebin, and how the City of Darebin should provide services to older people in the longer term future.

What can you do?

Council will keep you informed throughout the decision making process. You will hear from us once the panel of experts has started and how you can have your say. Read the related reports and find answers to Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) on this page. Stay in touch and leave your comments and suggestions in the section below.



Ask us anything! 

You can also share your interesting ideas in the categories outlined in the report.

We will get back to you as quickly as possible. Please allow up to five business days.

Q&A

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  • As a senior citizen without a car the 86 tram is my main means of transport. However the no. 52 tram stop at cnr Plenty Rd and Tyler St only operates for journeys to the city. On return journey passengers have to alight at stop 51 or 53. This adds nearly 10 mins extra walking time and uphill with shopping trolleys etc. I am concerned when I may need a walking stick or walker as my arthritis gets worse. I contacted Yarra Trams but their reply indicated that the new trams stopping would prevent traffic flowing and they had no intention of replacing it. The tram stops ok on the north side of Plenty Rd at the remaining city bound 52 stop. The traffic has to stop then. I don’t see why a tram stop cannot be build on that side of Plenty Rd so that trams stop in the centre of the road similar to tram stops in Northcote and Westgarth. Instead passengers, including the elderly and disabled have to walk an extra kilometre or so uphill. It is also dangerous not just to our health in inclement weather but in the past there have been assaults and attacks on elderly people and a past rape on an elderly woman alighting at stop 53. I would appreciate any persuasion Darebin Council could give to the necessary authorities to restore stop 52 or build a new stop on the northern side so people especially the elderly and infirm don’t have to walk so far with heavy parcels etc to their homes.

    Alexandra Irini asked 5 months ago

    Hi Alexandra, thanks for your question!

    Council’s understanding is that the changes at this location were undertaken to allow the longer e-class trams to be used on tram Route 86. Council requested at the time that a solution be found so that the tram stop on the south side could be retained, but was told this wasn’t possible. Unfortunately, public transport is managed by the State Government, and Plenty Road is an arterial road managed by VicRoads, so Council has very little influence.

    It may be worth contacting Public Transport Victoria, along with your local MP (Robin Scott I assume) and the Minister for Public Transport Jacinta Allan, as this matter falls within their responsibility:

    Robin Scott, State Labor Member for Preston

    T: 9478 5611

    robin.scott@parliament.vic.gov.au

    Jacinta Allan, Minister for Public Transport and Minister for Major Projects 

    T: 5443 2144

    http://www.jacintaallan.com/Pages/Contact.aspx

    Council’s Aged and Disability Department will also be adding this issue to the list of concerns older residents have made regarding public transport through our advocacy to Government.



  • I know there must be a lot of older people who would appreciate the Community Buses that pick up people at home, go to Northcote Plaza, and Northland but hardly anyone knows about this service. When I first found out a couple of years ago, rang up transport at council, told I had to go through My Aged Care and given a 1800 number and go through hoops - now I am 82, with it and could navigate my way through these people who ask a lot of questions - OK - it came to where was I born = London England, next question was I an Aborigine or Torres Strait Islander - no I repeated London England and she said she guessed that question was for Australians. Who when they are faced with this farce would continue and as it is not advertised by Council they are missing out plus Council could be putting bums on seats and picking up extra money. I love this service and only found out through my elderly cits club and speaking with the women there. WHAT CAN YOU DO TO INCREASE THE NUMBER OF PEOPLE WHO MIGHT LIKE THIS SERVICE WHICH IS BRILLIANT AND ALL POWER TO THE WONDERFUL DRIVERS WHO DESERVE A MEDAL. Angela

    6 months ago

    Firstly, thank you for your positive feedback about our transport staff, we will pass it on to them.

    We have recently undertaken a large community consultation exercise with older people in Darebin about what they need to age well, and Transport is evidently a very important issue. Being able to access Public Transport is a strong concern, as was being able to get around safely, and being able to come and go when and where you need to, such as offered by the convenience and security of taxi and ride-sharing services. Council services are a small part of the big picture, offering to eligible clients the community bus as you mentioned, or escorted shopping.

    Promotion of our services is done via several channels. All new clients are provided an information pack that outlines all of our services and they are talked through. Flyers are handed out at community events, community groups and clubs. The Darebin Council website has all the service information, and when residents call with queries information is given over the phone. Our services are all listed on the My Aged Care system. We are happy to hear about other effective ways to promote services.


  • I am a pensioner and have health issues which requires me to have home help I have now been receiving home help for a while but the past year since all the changes came in have been so disruptive to my home care . I no longer have a regular carer I have anybody turning up for my care and when i complain am told that as of next week so and so will be your carer ,can I say I am so annoyed and angry at being told that every time I call the council to ask where is my regular carer I feel like I am being taken for a joke . Its not fair that I should open my home to people that i dont know have to explain every time what to do and it never really gets done .Some weeks I am left without a carer because they want to come at the most inconvenient of times , and so very unfair to the carers themselves being shoved from pillar to post not knowing who they are going to care for on the day . I truly feel let down by the Darebin Council and I feel like as a residents with needs am not listened too . Please listen to your residents

    Maria asked 6 months ago

    I am very sorry that your experience of our service has left you feeling let down and not listened to. That is definitely not what we want to be the case for you or anyone else. There has been a period of disruption causing concerns for some clients with regard to some services. This has at times affected the regularity of staff, and our communication, both of which we have been working hard to fix. We realise it has not been improved quickly enough in some areas. I am glad that you have been calling to tell us your concerns because whilst we do not want things to go wrong, if they do go wrong, it is better that we know about it and can try to correct it. You are right that we can always improve how well we listen and respond to residents’ concerns.

    You are of course entitled to make a formal complaint, whether it is about the service itself or about the way your concerns were handled. 


  • Having moved to Reservoir and the Darebin shire 6 months ago, I am still coming to terms with the availabilities of my age care. My local rsl had a day trip to the chateau tabilk winery preceded by a 2 hour journey around the Negambi lakes. As the majority were pensioners discussion with a number of them confirmed they loved to just get out and have a nice day, a chat and a glass of wine. As we enter the last stage of our lives, we have done the hard yard, let's keep it simple, uncomplicated and the availability of having a glass of wine with our new found friends!

    Kevin Reilly (young pensioner, almost 70) asked 6 months ago

    Glad to hear about your lovely trip!

    Our recent community consultation has told us that social connection is very important for ageing well. The next phase of that work is consulting with experts to understand how council can better support a range of ways for older people to feel connected and have enjoyable, meaningful things to do.


  • In relation to the last Q:What can we do to ensure better help to live independently in the new funding system/ you could add that Darebin CC could advocate with the Commonwealth about the inclusion of the Homeshare model as a service to be offered as part of the NDIS and MyAged care . The national body HANZA is busy working with the feds on this, and it would be good to have local government support. http://www.homeshare.org.au/news/submission-to-future-reform-an-integrated-care-at-home-program-to-support-older-australians/

    Meg Montague asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for sharing your thoughts on this with us.

    Council recognises that that one of the major policy and funding gaps for older people and people with disabilities (and their carers) in the new aged care reform and the roll out of NDIS is affordable housing. At the same time, there has been a spike in the number of older women ‘sleeping rough’ or in insecure unsafe boarding houses.

    As such Darebin Council have:

    ·  Endorsed the use of Council owned land for the development of social and affordable housing;

    ·  Prioritised older women and people with disabilities as priorities for housing.

    ·  Actively advocated to the State and Federal Government for capital funds to build on Council land.

    ·  Targeted advocacy to relevant Age Care Ministers and to the NDIA for capital funds

    ·  Acknowledged, promoted and intend to expand the ‘Homeshare’ model in Council’s Affordable Housing Policy 2018 – 2022 as key action to support  the independence and well-being older people and people with disabilities ( and their carers) 

    ·  Always been guided by the individual’s lived experience to guide policy.

  • I have been asking for 2 years for the reservoir leisure centre to run classes after midday suitable for older persons. They do have the living longer stronger program which I started but as with a lot of older persons who have been inactive for a long time I had a lot of subtle injuries and my osteopath told me to quit. What we need, and I have spoken to a few of my friends is a stretching class so our muscles can become flexible enough to exercise. Also all classes are before midday at the moment including the arthritis class, most older persons that I know are bored out of their brain after lunch but before dinner. There are no yoga or any other classes that can be taken during the day. I would like to know if anything can be done about this and if not, why. Its great to have seniors badminton and walking football and alike but if your muscles aren't flexible its impossible not to hurt yourself.

    colleen asked 10 months ago

    Hi Colleen

    Thank you for your feedback in regards to older adult classes after midday at Reservoir Leisure Centre. We are currently reviewing our timetable to make sure we are offering the best programs for our patrons. A Group Exercise Survey was recently issued to members and guests and we have received an overwhelming response in regards to what programs and time-slots people would like classes to run.  The survey has now closed, but I will add your feedback to the mix.  At this time we are not seeing a demand to run classes after midday and from the discussions I have had with Staying Active members they have requested to have classes similar to Living  Longer Living Stronger (LLLS) earlier in the day.

    We currently run a Yoga class on a Friday at 11:35am and we will be introducing another one on a Sunday morning around the same time. Tai Chi has also been a popular request and we are currently trying to source an instructor that maybe available after one of our LLLS classes. Our new  group exercise timetable will be launching late October and I do hope you find some suitable classes for yourself.

    Reservoir Leisure Centre will also be working closely with Darebin Community Health at launching a new chair based strength training class in 2018. This will create a pathway program into our other classes and hopefully be suitable and accessible to all of the community.


  • What can residents do to convince Darebin Council to continue providing aged care services into the future? The transition to the NDIS has caused such confusion and distress for people with a disability and their families. The advent of Aged Care Reform is likely to be equally disruptive. Older people like me believe Council as a trusted provider and advocate must remain engaged.

    Dylan asked 10 months ago

    Hi Dylan

    It is good to know that you view council as a trusted supporter of older people. Council is definitely committed to remaining engaged in, and responsive to, the needs of older residents. Big system changes at the national level like the NDIS and My Aged Care can indeed cause some disruption and uncertainty for individuals in the initial stages of the roll out. It changes so many details about how people can enquire about, or obtain services, the types of services offered, or alter their arrangements.

    Council decided last year not to be a provider of home-based services under the NDIS, but this had no bearing on individuals’ experiences of the roll out of the NDIS. There is also no direct link between Council providing services and an individual’s experience of the national My Aged Care system. Council cannot change the My Aged Care system itself or how it is implemented, regardless of the services provided.

    Council staff will however always do their best to provide the right information, advocate where needed and support people in the most effective ways available, including via services, support, activities, facilities, and communications.